General

Your perfect Caribbean Beach getaway starts with a personalized check-in & welcome cocktail. Then enjoy our 250ft blue lagoon pool & heated 8 person jacuzzi, free in-villa & public area wifi, beach volleyball, board games, book exchange and canopied shade beds & lounge chairs. Dine at 4 all-inclusive restaurants with á la carte & buffet style natural, low calorie, vegetarian and deli-style menus as well as unlimited premium drinks including domestic & international liquors, beers & wines and take in daily entertainment like live music and cultural shows.

Relax at Kukut (meaning “body” in ancient Mayan) spa with massage, facials, waxing & nail services or explore with our Tour coordinator service & jump into a free introductory scuba diving lesson.

Pets

Pets are allowed on request. Charges may be applicable.

Facilities

  • Air Conditioning
  • Bath
  • Bathroom
  • Beachfront
  • Desk
  • Heating
  • Ironing board
  • Kitchenette
  • Laundry/Valet service
  • Pay-per-view Channels
  • Restaurant
  • Room service - full menu
  • Telephone
  • Television
  • Toilet
  • WIFI

Activities

Bicycle rental

Internet

WiFi is available in all areas and is free of charge.

Parking

Parking not provided on the spot.

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Roatan

Roatan

Roatan, located between the islands of Utila and Guanaja, is the largest of Honduras’ Bay Islands. The island was formerly known as Ruatan and Rattan. It is approximately 77 kilometers (48 mi) long, and less than 8 kilometers (5.0 mi) across at its widest point.

Nightlife

NightlifeFor a good nightlife time you must get to West End. It's a cool little town comprised mostly of bars and restaurants that sits right on the water. West End abound in small, open walled bars, some of them with live music from local bands. The town typically gets more crowded on weekends as the bars stay open later and more locals come out.

Culture & history

Culture & historyLong before Christopher Columbus landed on the Bay Islands in 1502, Paya Indians called Roatan their home. While not much is known about the very first inhabitants of the island, it is believed people roamed this paradise as early as 600 AD. Today, “Yaba-dind-dings” (Paya artifacts) are still found including pottery, shell ornaments, conch trumpets and clay figures. Roatan has a rich history of pirating on the island. The island became a hideout for French, English and Dutch pirates who would intercept and conquer Spanish cargo vessels en route to Europe loaded with gold and other treasures. It is estimated by the mid 17th century there were approximately 5,000 pirates living on Roatan and the Bay Islands. Some of the names you may recognize: Henry Morgan, Blackbeard, John Coxen, and Van Horn once ruled these shores and waters. history_and_culture_shipwreck_pic By the late 1700s, the Spanish had either killed most of the pirates or sold them as slaves, taking control of the community of Port Royal, Roatan’s oldest European settlement. Not too long after in 1797, approximately 2000 Black Caribs were left on the island by the British. The settlement of Punta Gorda was established and the Garifuna people as they became known, live there to this day. Each year in April, a festival celebrates the anniversary of the Garifuna people’s arrival. British ruled the Bay Islands area from the late 1700s until 1982 at which time it was returned to the Spanish and became part of Honduras. Diversity is perhaps the best way to describe the collection of culture that has created Roatan’s unique culture over time including a mix of Carib, European and African heritage. In recent years many European and North Americans have made Roatan their home and an increasing number of ladinos (a mixture of European and Indian parentage) have moved here. English was for many years the first official language of the Bay Islands under British rule and is still the most dominant language spoke. Spanish is increasingly used as more people from the mainland move to the island. And if you venture to the village of Punta Gorda, you’ll even hear the traditional Garifuna spoken.
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